How Many Stories are in Your Possession? The Art of Antiquing

The joy of entering an old dusty building full of old dusty things is something that many people just don’t understand. What’s the point in buying something you can’t really use, and that was used a long time ago by someone else? A valid question, but one that misses the point. People who enjoy “antiquing” are generally the same people who love history and frequent museums. The point of buying an antique is because the history of it – not just where it came from but when it was made and why – outweighs the fact that it may not really be functional for everyday use. And that’s perfectly okay. If something makes a person happy just by looking at it, regardless of how useful it is, then it fulfills the purpose an antique is meant to complete.

What makes something an antique?

Some experts say antiques have to be masterpieces of style or design to be considered an actual antique, while others say that an antique can be anything from the 1920s or before. There are many people who would describe something as a design masterpiece that others would strongly disagree with, so as a general rule, something can be considered an antique once it crosses the 100 year line. If it’s been around for 100 years or more, it’s an antique.

The 100 years rule of thumb came about because in 1930 the United States government put a tax law into effect. Basically, the law stated that a physical object would be considered antique if it was made before 1830. In 1966 it became standard practice that an item could only be considered antique if it was 100 years or older. This practice was adopted because antique objects are tax exempt, and people kept trying to claim things as antique when they actually weren’t.

Antiquing – how to get started

Whether your grandfather gave you an old musket when you turned 12 or your 80 year old aunt gave her pearls to you when you got married, a lot of us have had some kind of exposure to antiques. If antiquing is something you’re interested in doing but the idea of going to an antique store and looking around seems overwhelming, checking out some antique festivals in your area is a great way to meet with people who love antiques. These people are usually excited to talk about antiquing and how they got into it – which means they are also pretty good at giving advice as to how someone should go about getting into the world of antiques.

Michigan Antique Festivals – Davisburg

This May you have the opportunity to get your start with antique festivals at the Springfield Oaks County Park. With five indoor buildings full of antiques dealers, enthusiasts, and collectors, your education into the world of antiques could not start any better.

The festival runs May 2-3 and again October 3-4. Take a look at the Michigan Antique Festivals website for more information.

 

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