Fun Fact About St. Patrick’s Day!

By: HomeFirst Certified
March 14, 2013


Did you know that originally the color blue was associated with St. Patrick’s Day? It’s true. Impress your friends this St. Patrick’s Day with these fun facts:

 

St. Patrick’s Day is named after Saint Patrick, the most commonly recognized of the patron saints of Ireland.

Saint Patrick used the shamrock because it was a three-leaved plant. He used it to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagan Irish.

It since has become a ubiquitous feature of the day.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the highest number of leaves found on a clover is 14.

St. Patrick’s Day is observed on March 17 because that is the feast day of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. It is believed that he died on March 17 in the year 461 AD. It is also a worldwide celebration of Irish culture and history.

St. Patrick’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland, and a provincial holiday in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It technically isn’t a legal holiday in the U.S.

One estimate suggests that there are about 10,000 regular three-leaf clovers for every lucky four-leaf clover.

St. Patrick did not actually drive snakes out of Ireland; the snakes represent the pagans that he converted to Christianity.

The very first St. Patrick’s Day parade was not in Ireland. It was in Boston in 1737.

In Ireland on St. Patrick’s Day, people traditionally wear a small bunch of shamrocks on their jackets or caps. Children wear orange, white and green badges, and women and girls wear green ribbons in their hair.

Many people wear green on this holiday to avoid being pinched.

The phrase, “Drowning The Shamrock” is from the custom of floating the shamrock on the top of whiskey before drinking it.

The Irish believe that if you keep the custom, then you will have a prosperous year.

How will you celebrate this year?

Fun Fact About St. Patrick's Day!

By: RichW
March 14, 2013


Did you know that originally the color blue was associated with St. Patrick’s Day? It’s true. Impress your friends this St. Patrick’s Day with these fun facts:

 

St. Patrick’s Day is named after Saint Patrick, the most commonly recognized of the patron saints of Ireland.

Saint Patrick used the shamrock because it was a three-leaved plant. He used it to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagan Irish.

It since has become a ubiquitous feature of the day.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the highest number of leaves found on a clover is 14.

St. Patrick’s Day is observed on March 17 because that is the feast day of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. It is believed that he died on March 17 in the year 461 AD. It is also a worldwide celebration of Irish culture and history.

St. Patrick’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland, and a provincial holiday in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It technically isn’t a legal holiday in the U.S.

One estimate suggests that there are about 10,000 regular three-leaf clovers for every lucky four-leaf clover.

St. Patrick did not actually drive snakes out of Ireland; the snakes represent the pagans that he converted to Christianity.

The very first St. Patrick’s Day parade was not in Ireland. It was in Boston in 1737.

In Ireland on St. Patrick’s Day, people traditionally wear a small bunch of shamrocks on their jackets or caps. Children wear orange, white and green badges, and women and girls wear green ribbons in their hair.

Many people wear green on this holiday to avoid being pinched.

The phrase, “Drowning The Shamrock” is from the custom of floating the shamrock on the top of whiskey before drinking it.

The Irish believe that if you keep the custom, then you will have a prosperous year.

How will you celebrate this year?

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